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Bugs on Blossoms

May 8, 2013

The fruit trees are in full blossom today. They are beautiful in themselves, but they are also host to a whole community of insects. We all know that honey bees are important – pollination by honey bees make many of our crops, including domestic fruit possible. Not to mention honey production!!!

But there are many other insects that distribute pollen from one plant to another. There are, of course, the bumble bees, but there are flies that look like bees and moths that look like bumble bees or hummingbirds. And many, many other pollinators.

I have always found insects very interesting. I have a very early memory of watching ants at a small anthill in a sidewalk crack. It occurred to me then that these creatures were totally apart from me. I would not have known how to express my fascination then – but they were autonomous and totally oblivious of me. That is still an intriguing thought. There is a whole world of other beings with intriguing lives out there – and most are unaware of people and their concerns.

Anyway, I have included some photos of some pollinators that I have seen recently on the cherry, plum and apple trees here. I hope these photos stir an interest in insects for you too.

Bumble Bee on a blossom.

Bumble Bee on a blossom.

A syrphid fly - if it looks like a bee, acts like a bee and sounds like a bee - it could be a fly!

A syrphid fly – if it looks like a bee, acts like a bee and sounds like a bee – it could be a fly!

A Bee Fly (Bombyllidae) visiting lilacs.  This family is parasitic on bee larvae and can be important pollinators.

A Bee Fly (Bombyllidae) visiting lilacs. This family is parasitic on bee larvae and can be important pollinators.

Visiting a cherry blossom

A honey bee laden with pollen

A honey bee laden with pollen

A honey bee visiting a cherry blossom

A Clearwing Moth (genus Hemaris) possibly a Snowberry Clearwing Moth - imitating - a hummingbird?

A Clearwing Moth (genus Hemaris) possibly a Snowberry Clearwing Moth – imitating – a hummingbird or a bumblebee?

A Clearwing Moth and cherry blossoms

A Clearwing Moth and cherry blossoms

Maybe eating fresh buds??

Maybe eating fresh buds??

The adult form of the Stonefly.  The carnivorous nymphs are aquatic.  The winged adults eat buds or leaves.

The adult form of the Stonefly. The carnivorous nymphs are aquatic. The winged adults eat buds or leaves.

all photos and writing copyright Joanne Siderius 2013.

4 Comments
  1. I love watching the determination insects seem to have….great photos!

    • Thank you – I guess they have to be determined – they only have a short time to get on with it –

  2. Fascinating pictures of the pollinators you observed! I too could watch insects on blossoms for hours. This past summer, the biggest hit with the pollinators in my garden was my valerian and oregano. My yard was buzzing all summer!!

    • We had frost this morning and a skiff of ice on the dog’s water – but there are still one or two bees on the flowers sheltered in the sun. Cheers!

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